Dancehall + Roots=Vibes

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Chancellor - page 2

Chancellor has 80 articles published.

Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley – R.O.A.R.

in Vids & Lyrics by

“R.O.A.R.”

Big up the lion dem weh roar fi a cause
Defend your community at all cost
Never yet run, stand your ground to the last
Real outlaw, people love we, becauseNo old woman purse can’t get grab of
No juvenile ‘pon the road after dark
No visitors can get rob inna the park
Else bwoy will finish before dem start
No shotta can gi’ no juvenile gun
No stinginess when the site money run
No lickkle shop can get bruk inna the slum
All who perpetrator haffi pack up and run
No man do more dem share of kegs
One voice a talk just like Simeon says
No man no thief when the Ackee Tree bear
It mek war bruk out and it happen each yearNo man no frowns when a man a mek food
Kings at the road, yes a dem a get rude
No shot no buss when a man a keep treat
No man no disturb the children peace
No car no bruk when you hear dancehall keep
The last man weh try, burn up like rizzla sheet
Dem hear say me soon come, tell dem me reach
No man no talk when the general speak, ’causeMe and unno…

Dem go rob the chiney man and that a disrespect
And a gwaan like dem a don an’ still a money nah mek
And a gwaan like dem a captain a the damn ship wreck
Soon the nuff a dem a suffer damn twist neck
Tek it, mek an example, so the thing set
All violators know what come next
Misbehaving, trouble meking, yo, we won’t accept
Certain bwoy fi disappear ‘pon a magic carpet
All, nuisance get weh dem fi get
People live peaceful, no need to fret, ’cause

A we a guard dem out a street
Late at night when dem a sleep
Kids in bed and counting sheep
And when they wake up inna the morning, they’ll living sweet
Enterprise operation, ruff up well neat
Back to business, everything on beat

No man to more than dem share of greens
No man no frowns when no fish nah steam
No man no frowns when the pot waan clean
No man no drink out the don spurline
No man go road weh the big man said
No man no greedy a nah bruk bread
No man no go ’round the royal laws
All disloyal, get nail ‘pon cross

Me and unno…

A we a guard dem out a street
Late at night when dem a sleep
A we a guard dem out a street
Late at night when dem a sleep

A we a guard dem out a street
Late at night when dem a sleep
A we a guard dem out a street
Late at night when dem a sleep

Chronixx drops by Sway’s Universe

in Reggae News by

Chronixx stopped by Sway’s Universe to promote his album Chronology which dropped 7/7/17. He talked Life’s Purpose, African diasporic genealogical detachment, Rastafari Livity and more. He emphasized that despite the hurdles one faces in life, there is always a greater purpose to be fulfilled. He went on to note that his dedication is not just to Africa but to Humanity. Watch him murder Sway’s 5 Fingers freestyle with ease.

DANCEHALL the origins of Hip Hop

The usage of sound systems and rapping over beats (toasting) was prominent in Caribbean dancehall, reggae, calypso, and dub music before the 1970’s creation of Hip Hop in America. Example of 60’s Jamaican dub artist, King Tubby. source

DJ Kool Herc, often considered one of the founding fathers of Hip Hop, discusses how his Caribbean Heritage influenced him and his work in Hip Hop.

BUY Chronology HERE

Psalm 15 vs Einstein

in Chant a Psalm by

15  Lord, who shall abide in thy tabernacle? who shall dwell in thy holy hill?

He that walketh uprightly, and worketh righteousness, and speaketh the truth in his heart.

He that backbiteth not with his tongue, nor doeth evil to his neighbour, nor taketh up a reproach against his neighbour.

In whose eyes a vile person is contemned; but he honoureth them that fear the Lord. He that sweareth to his own hurt, and changeth not.

He that putteth not out his money to usury, nor taketh reward against the innocent. He that doeth these things shall never be moved.

Sumfest Roundup

in Reggae News by
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FRIDAY JULY 21, 2017  

DANCEHALL NIGHT 1

DOORS OPEN 7 PM

SHOWTIME 8:30 PM – 6 AM
CATHERINE HALL FESTIVAL GROUNDS MONTEGO BAY, JAMAICA

18 & OLDER TO DRINK

Alkaline, Mavado, Bounty Killer, Tory Lanez, Aidonia, Dexta Daps, Spice, Tommy Lee Sparta, Masicka , African Star Patoranking , Devin Di Dakta, Tifa , Jahmiel , Ding Dong , Harry Toddler & Ikel Marvelous featuring Bucky Marshall & Tuffa Lie & John Hype & Shelly Belly & Shankle Dip & Blazzy , Shenseea , TJ , and surprise guest stars.

Program subject to change anytime.
Show Rain or Shine.

 

SATURDAY JULY 22, 2017

REGGAE  NIGHT 2

DOORS OPEN AT 7PM

SHOWTIME 8:30 PM – 6 AM
CATHERINE HALL FESTIVAL GROUNDS, Montego Bay, Jamaica

18 & OLDER TO DRINK 

Featured artists are Sean Paul , Sizzla, Beenie Man, Jah Cure , Queen Ifrica, Christopher Martin, Richie Stephens & The Ska Nation Band, Kabaka Pyramid, Mad Cobra, Feluke, Deep Jahi, Meleku’, Davianah , and surprise guest stars.

Program subject to change anytime.
Show Rain or Shine.

 

 

Freddie McGregor, RastafarI and Dancehall

in Reggae News by

Freddie Mcgregor celebrated his 60th birthday this week. He’s had a vibrant career contributing to reggae and dancehall over the course of almost 6 decades. Mcgregor is among the likes of Dennis Brown, Bob Marley, Judy Mowatt and others who in time joined the Twelve Tribes of Israel.

Freddie’s popularity soared in the early 80’s with the release of Bobby Bobylon and hits like Big Ship, Push Comes to Shove, Just Don’t Want To Be Lonely (a UK top ten hit) and I Was Born a Winner.

The establishment of the Big Ship Label in 1983 is possibly one of Freddie’s most lasting contributions to the industry. The label has gone on to produce for artists like Papa San, Lieutenant Stitchie, Tiger, Luciano and Mickey Spice. His Son Stephen seriously intends to keep up with his father’s legacy having produced countless contemporary dancehall/reggae hits. This year Stephen contributed to Shakira’s latest album. In 2013 Freddie received a Marcus Garvey Lifetime Achievement Award from the Institute of Caribbean Studies.

RastaFaraI and Dancehall

There is no doubt that Rastafarianism has played a major role in defining Jamaica’s identity. Almost everything which makes Jamaica so different from the host of islands that dot the globe is Rastafarianism and reggae music. Many tourists still believe Jamaica’s national colours are red, green and gold. While these colors have been rightly appropriated from the Abyssinian flag to signify the movements imperial sovereignty and direct association with His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie (Ras Tafari).

The early 90’s saw an upsurge of interest in Rastafarianism. Perhaps it was due to a collective rise in black nationalism that surged after the widely publicized Rodney King incident, Spike Lee movies and Hip Hop music which began to reflect more and more nationalistic content. It appears simultaneously reggae and dancehall saw its own resurgence of nationalism as popular dancehall deejays like Capleton and Buju Banton began growing locks and infusing Africa and Rasta tenets into their tunes.

It seems music coming from Africans in the diaspora may follow common fluctuations of highs and lows in terms of culturally conscious content. Whether its Billie Holiday’s Strange Fruit, Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On, Garnett Silk’s Christ in his Kingly Character or Buju’s Til Shiloh, there is a consistent common thread that seems to begin to lean towards something more than the money, love, power and sexual prowess subject matter that experiences popularity spikes throughout music’s ongoing history.

Reggae Routes: The Story of Jamaican Music

Tanya Stephens vs. Portia

in Reggae News by
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    source: jamaica observer
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    source: jamaica observer
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Some people can do no wrong and artists, athletes and some politicians have more in common than meets the eye. Tanya Stephens sounded off in a Twitter post this week on the resignation of Jamaica’s first female prime minister, Portia Simpson.

According to reports the now deleted comment compared Portia’s time in office to a rapist. The assumption that Simpson sold out JA during her term has been a sentiment shared by the older JA audience for some time now. Clovis has been speaking volumes in his daily funnies where Portia’s political endeavors often take center stage.

Tanya Stephens calls it like she sees it and that’s why we love her. She demands professionalism and respect in the industry and gets it because she has consistency to back her. She wrote about those things women thought about but don’t say. From Goggle to Too Hype to Gangsta Blues and the original Rebellution (before REBELLUTION) Stephens been inspiring and empowering women throughout the course of her career.

Some said that Stephens should support Simpson simply because she is a woman. While others commented that discrediting Portia’s time in office is somehow hindering the feminist movement. The way I see it Stephen’s is empowering women everyday through her lyrics old and new. Now some will say that I am bias by dancehall association. They are probably right.

source: jamaica observer
Source: The Daily Mail

Athletes are often given a universal pass in the eyes of their global fans. Prime example Dennis Rodman and Kim Jong Un all buddy buddy right now. Dennis Rodman’s persona and career achievements trumps his alliances in the eyes of a country that is allegedly a known “enemy”.  The Washington Post has a pretty good breakdown of just how deep political alliances can run.

In a mammoth survey of 40,000 Americans in all 50 states, Public Religion Research Institute found that “only half (50%) of white Americans believe blacks face a lot of discrimination, while roughly as many (47%) say this is not the case. Majorities of black Americans (85%), Hispanics (66%), mixed-race Americans (64%), and Asian-Pacific Islander (API) Americans (55%) say blacks face significant levels of discrimination today.”

This is an interesting survey who’s implications infer a clear bias in a country just 50 years from the civil rights movements that spawned the likes of Malcom X and Martin Luther King and that in recent years has had more police shootings targeting young black males than ever before. But according to the numbers 47% of white Americans believe African Americans don’t face much discrimination. Like Trump supporters and Republicans, political biases are often founded on turning a blind eye to the Raw facts. Don’t shoot the messenger for calling it. It’s still a free country. I think. *ducks low*

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